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Patrick Odell Kornegay

I was born in Weisbaden, Germany on July 7, 1949. We left Germany when I was three months old. We were flown back, because I had a bronchial infection. My parents were told that I would not live if we went by ship. My early years we moved many times. By the time I was seven we had been stationed in, California, Texas, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, and Alaska. I learned how to make friends and how to adjust to moving.This part of my life taught me how to meet people start relationships and make friends all at the same time.

I remember we traveled from Pennsylvania to Texas in our 1954 Desoto. On this trip I brought a baby chicken that traveled in the car with us. What a trip that was. I remember mother making sandwiches and wrapping them in foil and putting them under the hood of the Desoto to keep them warm. Dad was the kind of man that didn’t believe in stopping except for gas. Then you did your business, unless you were a boy. Then you got the coke bottle and filled it up and threw it out the window. As a kid I slept in the back window, with windows down because there was no air conditioning at that time.

I remember watching the Sputnick in the sky while we were stationed in Fairbanks. Breaking my arm and no one could fix it. So we had to drive to Ladd Army Base and let Dr. Right fix me up. He did a great job considering it was broken at the elbow. While we were stationed in Alaska, It became a state… a lot of celebrating going on then. We then ended up in White Sands, New Mexico. After that we ended up back in San Angelo, Texas. There Dad retired.

But life as I knew it was just beginning. Dad took a job with a company contracted by the gov’t. We ended up in Ankara, Turkey. That was in my teenage years. It was the best years of my life. I met so many brats and made so many friends that I still have today. It also allowed me to live in another country and learn their customs and language. I spoke the language fluently and my father asked me to translate what he wanted his Turkish workers to do. I formed so many relationships with my Turkish friends, and had so many wonderful times. I used to travel all over Ankara by myself at the age of 15. I never had any problems and was treated with respect. I believe this was due to my Turkish. There are so many stories to tell, experiences, and friendships that I created I don’t know if there is enough room or if you would want to hear. I will tell you this, the Turkish people as a whole were some of the best people that I ever met. I met them on their ground, learned their language, respected their customs. I never wanted to leave to come back to the States.

By the time I had graduated from George C. Marshall Regional High School in Ankara, I had lived most of my life going from post to post. Ankara, Turkey was where I had lived the longest, 5 years! Add the 5 years in Ankara and the 2 years in Alaska before it became a state. That’s seven years of my 18 of overseas. As I said my formidable years were in Turkey. I made so many friends in high school and to this day we have a connection that no one can take away, that no one understands, except brats…….I will always be a brat. The one thing our family learned was on his deathbed, Dad confessed he had been working for the CIA. We were all stunned… he never let on. My sister found a little black book with crypto in it. It was such an important part of the world at that time with the Cold War and such. But I was so naive and unassuming. I have so much more and so many more stories. But this is have enjoyed. Thanks so much.

Bryan Wardwell

I lived in Ankara, Turkey from 1984-1986, and I would not change it for the world. The experiences we gain from being overseas and the things we got to see that 90% of the population will never know or experience in their lifetime.

My first memories are of the initial trip going over to Turkey. We stopped off in New York from Dallas, and then our flight headed to Paris. I never got a chance to leave the airport, but I can say I’ve been to Paris! Our next flight took us to Geneva, Switzerland, and again I never left the airport but from the sky I do not believe there is a more beautiful, colorful country. I remember ascending and seeing this lake by the airport that was a color blue I have yet to see again in y 43 years. All the trees and grass was such a vibrant green. Truly amazing to see first hand and I would love to return one day possibly.

Our last leg of the tour was to Istanbul and then our destination Ankara. So as a twelve year old visiting his first European/Asian assignment that night was a culture shock. I did not sleep at all due to the time differences, but I will never forget the first time I heard prayer that morning. Looking out of the window watching the people and how they look, how they are dressed and even the way they carry themselves was different. I noticed the men would walk with their arms locked behind their backs. I cant say I fell in love with the country right away especially since I was home sick missing my friend and family back home knowing I wouldn’t see them for two years. I can however say I knew I really was gong to enjoy my time here after about 2 months and I got to meet people and went out to eat and shop. My biggest like if you will is the Turkish Lira to one dollar. I believe it was $1 equaled 600 Lira when I first arrived, and with that 600 Lira I could catch a taxi and go to Tunali St and eat and come back via a taxi again! You will never see that bang for your buck anywhere else then or now!

So now that I was getting acquainted with people I began to have more and more friends. I would join sports like cross country, baseball, track, and even had a short stint in wrestling until I got hurt in practice. I made friends in those two years that I till have today, and in fact a friend I met from Incirlik became my wife 28 years later! We stayed friends all these years until 4 years ago when the timing seem to be perfect. So based on those facts I think being a military brat has left a profound effect on my life.

As a brat you have a certain bond that you do not share with everyday friends stateside. People just do not understand how it is when stationed overseas. Some other benefits are you learn about other cultures and those cultures differences. these I call values and with these values you learn to judge to quickly, and you can be friends with anyone from any culture, color, background and religion. I try to instill these very values to my kids and hope they are judgmental and hope they grow to be understanding of other people and how they live, dress, speak and their religions.

Being a military brat has left a lifetime of education, memories, experiences and friendships. As I am writing this at 1:20 in the a.m my friend of 30 years I went to school with in Turkey texts me. How many can say they have that kind of friendships that share these experiences? There very well might be someone somewhere, but I consider military brats our own .5% ers!! Just to wrap this up I can 100% honestly say I would do it all over again, the meeting of friends just to leave two years later. The pain you feel every year of other friends leaving and or you leaving. People who are born and raised in the same town to me are at a disadvantage to not have the opportunity to touch and be touched by so many more people whom could be the one like it was for me! If I had not been who I am and where I was I would not be married to my beautiful wife today. So for me it was a great experience and like I said i would do it again in a heartbeat!!!